Date

May 08 2024
Expired!

Time

9:00 am – 10:30 am

On behalf of the Resilience Funders Network, Impact Trust and Omega, you are invited to join us again on May 8th to continue to explore the pathways towards a more ecological civilisation and humanising society. In this conversation with Bill Rees, we will explore more deeply the biological and evolutionary challenges that may obstruct our capacity to find transformative and active approaches to reimagining how we live and operate in the world.

This conversation is not antithetical to the strategic hope of these Spring conversations. It does seek to explore a significant question that is raised by those reflecting on what the ‘counterforce’ driving momentum towards societal collapse may be. In the face of the possibility of this, how might we implement mechanisms for the cognitive awakening required at the individual and societal (civilisational) level?

From the perspective of evolutionary biology, Bill reflects on the ‘how’ question that asks, how do we inspire and ignite a shift away from the dominant social paradigm to a new ecological paradigm, at scale. What are the barriers to achieving this and enabling real and meaningful social change? 

Bill’s recent paper explores how the rapid evolution of the socio-technological environment has outpaced the slower biological evolution of the human brain, rendering the latter’s inherited cognitive processes functionally obsolete for dealing with today’s complex global challenges. Functional obsolescence occurs either because an entity (the brain, in this example) is surpassed by a new version that operates more effectively or improves essential survival functions. More relevant to humanity in the context of the current ecological crisis, obsolescence arises when the operating environment changes so dramatically that the entity itself (i.e. the brain and collectively, humanity) is no longer capable of performing in ways that ensure its own survival. 

As the pace of change continues to accelerate beyond the capabilities of traditional approaches to leadership and learning, there is an increasing disconnect between what is done and what is needed in the face of the polycrisis. Functional obsolescence reinforces the necessity for a paradigm shift in how we are prepared to navigate this complex landscape.

This session will explore how cultural and political dynamics influence life as we know it. Importantly, it will consider the opportunity this presents for philanthropy to build momentum for changing societal values and political landscapes, and explore how these shifts might impact funding priorities and strategies.

Join us on May 8th, 2024, at 9am PST / 12 noon EST / 5pm UK / 6pm CETRegister in advance for this meeting. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

William Rees is a human ecologist, ecological economist, Professor Emeritus and former Director of the University of British Columbia’s School of Community and Regional Planning in Vancouver, Canada, where his research and teaching focused on the biophysical prerequisites for sustainability…

Date

May 08 2024
Expired!

Time

9:00 am – 10:30 am

On behalf of the Resilience Funders Network, Impact Trust and Omega, you are invited to join us again on May 8th to continue to explore the pathways towards a more ecological civilisation and humanising society. In this conversation with Bill Rees, we will explore more deeply the biological and evolutionary challenges that may obstruct our capacity to find transformative and active approaches to reimagining how we live and operate in the world.

This conversation is not antithetical to the strategic hope of these Spring conversations. It does seek to explore a significant question that is raised by those reflecting on what the ‘counterforce’ driving momentum towards societal collapse may be. In the face of the possibility of this, how might we implement mechanisms for the cognitive awakening required at the individual and societal (civilisational) level?

From the perspective of evolutionary biology, Bill reflects on the ‘how’ question that asks, how do we inspire and ignite a shift away from the dominant social paradigm to a new ecological paradigm, at scale. What are the barriers to achieving this and enabling real and meaningful social change? 

Bill’s recent paper explores how the rapid evolution of the socio-technological environment has outpaced the slower biological evolution of the human brain, rendering the latter’s inherited cognitive processes functionally obsolete for dealing with today’s complex global challenges. Functional obsolescence occurs either because an entity (the brain, in this example) is surpassed by a new version that operates more effectively or improves essential survival functions. More relevant to humanity in the context of the current ecological crisis, obsolescence arises when the operating environment changes so dramatically that the entity itself (i.e. the brain and collectively, humanity) is no longer capable of performing in ways that ensure its own survival. 

As the pace of change continues to accelerate beyond the capabilities of traditional approaches to leadership and learning, there is an increasing disconnect between what is done and what is needed in the face of the polycrisis. Functional obsolescence reinforces the necessity for a paradigm shift in how we are prepared to navigate this complex landscape.

This session will explore how cultural and political dynamics influence life as we know it. Importantly, it will consider the opportunity this presents for philanthropy to build momentum for changing societal values and political landscapes, and explore how these shifts might impact funding priorities and strategies.

Join us on May 8th, 2024, at 9am PST / 12 noon EST / 5pm UK / 6pm CETRegister in advance for this meeting. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

William Rees is a human ecologist, ecological economist, Professor Emeritus and former Director of the University of British Columbia’s School of Community and Regional Planning in Vancouver, Canada, where his research and teaching focused on the biophysical prerequisites for sustainability…

Local Time

  • Timezone: America/New_York
  • Date: May 08 2024
  • Time: 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm

The event is finished.