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Why Peru is reviving a pre-Incan technology for water


By Erica Gies

Today, modern Peruvians are redeploying that ancient knowledge and protecting natural ecosystems such as high-altitude wetlands to help the country adapt to climate change.

It’s one of the world’s first efforts to integrate nature into water management on a national scale. It’s akin to the long-held attitude toward solar and wind power that is swiftly becoming outdated: they’re nice but were thought not to be capable of playing a major role in meeting our energy needs. Peru’s national programme, however, has the potential to demonstrate how effective slow water solutions can be when implemented on the scale of watersheds.

Read full article Why Peru is reviving a pre-Incan technology for water, published by the BBC.

How America Fractured Into Four Parts

By George Packer

Nations, like individuals, tell stories in order to understand what they are, where they come from, and what they want to be.

National narratives, like personal ones, are prone to sentimentality, grievance, pride, shame, self-blindness. There is never just one—they compete and constantly change. The most durable narratives are not the ones that stand up best to fact-checking. They’re the ones that address our deepest needs and desires.

Americans know by now that democracy depends on a baseline of shared reality—when facts become fungible, we’re lost. But just as no one can live a happy and productive life in nonstop self-criticism, nations require more than facts—they need stories that convey a moral identity. The long gaze in the mirror has to end in self-respect or it will swallow us up.

Read the full article… How America Fractured Into Four Parts published in The Atlantic July/August 2021

What to save? Climate Change Forces Brutal Choices at National Parks

By Zoe Schlanger

For more than a century, the core mission of the National Park Service has been preserving the natural heritage of the United States.

But now, as the planet warms, transforming ecosystems, the agency is conceding that its traditional goal of absolute conservation is no longer viable in many cases. Late last month the service published an 80-page document that lays out new guidance for park managers in the era of climate change.  The document, along with two peer-reviewed papers, is essentially a tool kit for the new world. It aims to help park ecologists and managers confront the fact that, increasingly, they must now actively choose what to save, what to shepherd through radical environmental transformation and what will vanish forever.

Read the full article.. What to Save? Climate Change Forces Brutal Choices at National Parks, published in the New York Times, May 18th 2021