More from this author

Permacrisis

By Gordon Brown, et al in Permacrisis….The longer a problem goes unresolved, the worse it will get; that’s what happens in a permacrisis – and that’s why we must act now.

The 2023 state of the climate report: Entering uncharted territory

by William J Ripple in BioScience…..Rather than focusing only on carbon reduction and climate change, addressing the underlying issue of ecological overshoot will give us our best shot at surviving these challenges in the long run. This is our moment to make a profound difference for all life on Earth, and we must embrace it with unwavering courage and determination to create a legacy of change that will stand the test of time.

For a Coming Extinction

BY W. S. MERWIN Gray whaleNow that we are sending you to The EndThat great godTell himThat we who follow you invented forgivenessAnd forgive nothing I write as though you could understandAnd I could say itOne must always pretend somethingAmong the dyingWhen you have...

Extreme weather leading to food and water shock

from Lloyd’s futureset and Cambridge Centre for Risk Studies…Without collaboration, protection and risk mitigation, the potential impacts of extreme and systemic weather events could prove devastating to the global economy. Our ‘Extreme weather leading to food and water shortage’ scenario uses modelling and analysis to expose the potential cost of a weather and food event unfolding over the next five years, at three different levels of severity. The analysis is based on the historic impacts of climate events and uses plausible projections to demonstrate economic and insurance impacts over the next five years..

Overshooting earth’s boundaries: an interview with Bill Rees

by Rachel Donald in World Sensorium Conservancy….Our impact on the planet cannot be understated. We have thrust Earth into a new geological period, destroyed the majority of the world’s wildlife, razed her forests, and rendered innumerable species extinct. We are expert consumers with no limits to our appetite, it seems. Unless the climate becomes so unstable our own systems break down. This, of course, is what we’re already seeing.

Weaving solidarity and hope: stories of regeneration and resilience

From Global tapestries of alternatives…..we learn that art is an important mode of everyday
resistance that can offer healing possibilities from the trauma of war, occupation
and destruction. It gives a sense of hope in most dire situations, the possibility
of creation and building collective solidarity

Rivers and water systems as weapons and casualties of the Russia‐Ukraine war

By Peter Gleick in Earth’s Future……Among the consequences of the conflict have been both direct and indirect effects on civilian populations, agriculture, military operations, water supplies and quality, and natural ecosystems. An historical review shows that such attacks have occurred in the past, but the extent and severity of the current violence appear unprecedented, raising important questions of international law and how international legal and scientific communities should respond.